In recent years, BDSM has gone mainstream, having previously been taboo. This unconventional type of sex has infiltrated pop culture massively. Books, songs, films, and even morning talk shows are turning attention to it.

Divulging our personal sexual fantasies and fetishes wasn’t so common 15 or even 10 years ago, especially if they weren’t “standard”. Things appear to have changed. A Durex survey found that over a third of adults in the United States use bondage tools, masks, or blindfolds during sex. BDSM is definitely in style – for better or for worse.

Admittedly, things don’t always play out in real life as they do in our minds. This argument could be either for or against BDSM depending on how you look at it. Whatever the case may be, it is very risky. There have been quite a few people showing up at emergency rooms the world over after having taken something too far, be it strangulation, excessive tying, or something else. Outcomes can range from pure embarrassment to real fear for one’s health due to medical issues.

In other words, if you don’t know what you’re doing, you’re best off doing something sexual that’s objectively safer. This type of sex carries a real health hazard with it.

E.L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey may have contributed to BDSM’s rising fame, but this type of sexual preference has been around since the dawn of time. Or at least since the days of the Marquis de Sade a few centuries ago. This “titan” of literature gave his name to “sadism”. I read Justine when I was young and I still get the chills (in an extremely bad way) when I think of it. I deeply regret giving in to my curiosity. If you ask me now, I’d say I have nothing against BDSM – the “innocent” type that we saw in 50 Shades, not that of the Marquis.